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105th New York Infantry

Item LTR-593
October 20, 1862 Walter N. Little
Price: $245.00

Description

4 pages, original Civil War Union letter written in period ink and war dated.

Sharpsburg
October 20th 1862

Good evening Amelia,

How are you anyhow? I hope you are well as I am at present.

I received your most welcome letter and I will try and answer it if they don’t call me out tonight, but I have not much news to write, but what I have you shall get.

I wrote in my last that they was a fighting but did not know where, but since I have found out that it was at Charlestown in Virginia, about six miles from Harper’s Ferry and four from Bolivar Heights. Our loss was small. Only three killed and six wounded. On the reb side they lost in killed ninety that we got but how many they took with them in their flight, we have no means of knowing. General Hancock led our men in the fight, but Mac. was there too. He is on hand where there is fighting to be done.

Well, Amelia, we expect to have a hard battle in a few days not far from here. For the Rebs are determined to winter in Maryland or Pennsylvania. But if they do it won’t take much to beat them. For if we can get them out of the mountains we will thin their ranks for them as we did at Antietam Creek, but I wish this war might be stopped before another such a battle is fought. For it would save a great many men’s lives and save a great amount of suffering by their friends at home. Here I will give you an instance. There was a man by the name of Walter Rogest. He was wounded in the battle at Antietam. But not very dangerously. He wrote home to his wife and she sat down and wrote a letter to know if she should come and take care of him. But before the letter reached him, he was gone to his last resting place. O my God! How must that wife feel. No pen describes her feeling, but she is only one among a thousand that are called to mourn the loss of a husband or a brother or a father or a lover, or it may be a widow’s only son. But I have got to stop for my candle is about gone. Please to excuse all mistakes in writing and spelling.

This from W. Little to his daughter A. E. Little


October 21st 1862

Good morning Amelia,


How do you do today anyhow? I am well and feel well. For I just received a letter form home and Henry got one from Father and Mother and Mary A. And I got one from Fred.